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The Curse of the Manuscript-Eating Slushpile Monster
by Cindy Appel

Category: General Nonfiction/Education
Description: According to the 2004 National Education Association's Reading at Risk study, 15 million Americans have attempted some kind of creative writing. Very few of these writers have had their work successfully published. Are you one of them? This funny guide for serious writers will make you laugh while you learn how to improve your manuscript's chances of surviving the arduous submission process. Find out how "Only You Can Prevent Formatting Follies" and how to avoid those "Prose Pile-Ups on Publication Road". After all, every writer longs for a happily ever after ending, right?
eBook Publisher: Uncial Press, 2008
eBookwise Release Date: September 2008

eBookeBook

3 Reader Ratings:
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Available eBook Formats: OEBFF Format (IMP) [121 KB]
Words: 23791
Reading time: 67-95 min.


Have you ever been on a job interview? Have you ever attended a business convention? Have you ever owned and run your own business? If you've done any of these things, then you probably have encountered business cards.

A business card has a dual purpose. First of all, it tells people who you are. It says, "I'm Joe Blow, licensed plumber," or "I'm Betty Buys-a-Lot, personal shopper." Secondly, a business card tells a potential customer or client what to expect from you and your service. "Pipes unclogged in five minutes flat or double your money back." "Hate shopping for your mother-in-law's birthday? I can help!"

Pretty basic, right?

So, what is a writers business card? Why, his or her manuscript, of course.

Remember, the editor is a busy person. She wants to read your manuscript and quickly make up her mind if her publishing firm can use your services. She needs to be convinced from the very first line, the very first paragraph, the very first page that you are who you claim to be--a capable writer--and that you can deliver the goods--a complete, publishable manuscript.

Your job is to make your business card as professional as possible. No sprinkled lavender cologne, no fancy fonts, print faces or paper colors. Remember, this is a professional presentation--not your teenager's diary. Act like a professional and you will be treated as such.

Which leads us straight into to rule number two.


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